Today’s episode gives you a rare inside look at the journey a Seattle hip-hop artist takes in the ride to prominence. The two guests also put to words the range of emotions many people are feeling as the city of Seattle undergoes a rapid transformation.

Draze, who has opened for Snoop Dogg and had his music appear on hit shows such as Empire, shares how Seattle’s transformation has affected his music and him personally.

You will also hear from Dave B, who collaborated with Macklemore on the hit song Corner Store, performed in front of a sold-out Key Arena, was seen on national tv performing on Jimmy Fallon’s Tonight Show, and recently headlined his own sold-out show at Seattle’s Neptune Theater.

Featuring the songs “The Hood Ain’t the Same” by Draze and “Sweetest Thing” by Dave B.

This episode of Seattle Growth Podcast continues its brief look at Seattle’s rich musical history. In today’s episode, Janie Hendrix (CEO of Experience Hendrix) shares how the city’s growth has affected her efforts to honor the legacy of Seattle-born rock and roll legend Jimi Hendrix. You will learn more about the continued impact Jimi Hendrix has on Seattle today.

The episode also features an interview with inaugural Seattle Music Commissioner DeVon Manier. Manier is cofounder of Sportn’ Life Music Group and works with Seattle artists such as the Black Tones and Future Shock. He shares stories from his time developing hip-hop artists at the turn of the century and what drove him to participate in the Seattle Music Commission.

The interviews give listeners a glimpse into Seattle’s musical past and provides insight into what the future holds for our growing city.

With appearances by Marco Collins, Ben London, Jason Finn, Draze, and Dave B.

Featuring the song”Woman in Black” by The Blacktones.

The fourth season of Seattle Growth Podcast brings together diverse perspectives from established and emerging artists, music lovers and music industry leaders to paint a picture of the past, present, and future of Seattle’s iconic music scene.


This second episode of the season continues last week’s focus on Seattle’s music community during the 1990s. Whereas Seattle had produced many notable musical artists in prior years, the sounds from the 1990s were distinctly recognized across the globe as emanating from this city.


The episode features singer-songwriter Ben London who began his Seattle music career while the Seattle sound, grunge, was exploding nationally. London went on to serve on the development team for the Experience Music Project (now known as MoPOP), to serve as an executive at the Grammys, and to serve as the inaugural chair of the Seattle Music Commission. You will hear what it was like to be “a footnote of flannel” during the Seattle grunge era and to do “all the things that other bands did, except…not sell millions of records.”


The episode also features Marco Collins, an influential radio DJ during the early 1990s who record executives from around the world turned to for insight into who would be the next big thing in music.The subject of his own documentary “The Glamour and the Squalor” opens up about what it was like to rub shoulders with Seattle’s rock stars, to help catapult bands to national prominence, and to have the whole world watching what was coming out of Seattle.


These two voices help paint a picture of a unique time in Seattle’s music history and provide insight into the city’s future.

“At this city, we’re at this incredible inflection point,” Seattle City Councilmember Rob Johnson told Jeff Shulman in the first episode of Seattle Growth Podcast in 2016. Fast-forward almost two years later and the “unprecedented growth” continues and Seattle Growth Podcast has become a well-known source for perspective on the transformation underway.

Now Seattle Growth Podcast brings its spotlight to the music community in our growing city. The rapid rise of Seattle’s tech industry has had the strongest impact on growth in this city and some tech workers, such as Daryl Ducharme, credit Seattle’s legendary music scene for spurring innovation. “There’s a lot of smart talented people here. And I really am of the belief that its because of the artists and entertainers we have here in Seattle. All that creative energy makes for… smart tech people who are coming up with creative solutions because we think outside the box, we think creatively.”

This season of Seattle Growth Podcast paints a picture of the past, present, and future of Seattle’s music scene. To understand where Seattle is going, it is important to know where it has been. You will hear from people who have played key roles in shaping Seattle’s identity.

The story begins in this first episode of season 4 with a look at the 1990s, an almost universally recognized era of Seattle sound. It was a time when America’s ears were tuned in to our city. It gave Seattle natives such as Pete Nordstrom, co-president of Nordstrom, “a sense of pride for what was happening in our community that we were a part of something that was really a big movement.”

Whereas Seattle had produced many notable musical artists in prior years, the sounds from the 1990s were distinctly recognized across the globe as emanating from this city.  With Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden, Presidents of the United States of America, Alice in Chains, and the Foo Fighters, Seattle was a powerful force in influencing popular culture and music. The industry and fans took notice. For example, 3 of the 5 nominees for best alternative music performance at the 38th annual Grammy Awards held in 1996 hailed from Seattle. Today’s episode features one of these nominees, the drummer for the Presidents of the United States of America, Jason Finn.

What was it like to be a Seattle musician in this era where one could be catapulted from playing Seattle’s Romper Room to selling millions of records? What was happening in Seattle that enabled local bands to take the national leap?

You’ll hear Jason Finn’s perspective on these questions and more. You’ll also hear the fan perspective from Daryl Ducharme, a music lover who worked at Guitar Center during the decade.

The interviews will paint a vivid picture of a unique moment in Seattle’s history that will also give insight into our future.


With musical intros performed by Naomi Wachira, Draze, and Porscha Shaw.


Professor Jeff Shulman has been interviewing a set of established and emerging artists, music lovers, and music industry leaders and will soon share their stories with you.

In this upcoming season of Seattle Growth Podcast, you will hear about our city’s transformation as told through the eyes of the music community. You will hear about the parallels and intersections with the tech community that is driving much of the city’s growth. And you will hear human stories that poetically put to words the excitement, anxiety, optimism, and concern that residents throughout the city are feeling as the Seattle of tomorrow promises to be very different than the Seattle of yesterday.

For music lovers, this season of Seattle Growth Podcast will highlight the growing legacy of Seattle music artists and give insight into how that legacy will be carried forward in the future. You are going to get to know the musicians who call Seattle home and hear the variety of sounds coming from the Emerald City.

As a sample of what can be expected in season 4 of Seattle Growth Podcast, this episode features an in-depth interview with Dave B; an emerging Seattle hip-hop artist who collaborated with Macklemore on the his song Corner Store.

Dave B performed on the Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, in a sold-out Key Arena, and is now set to headline a concert on January 27th at the Neptune Theater. In the interview, he describes his Seattle journey from performing in a choir to breaking out on the national stage. He shares his feelings toward the changes in Seattle as more people move in and the city transforms.


The episode also includes brief clips from the talented voices of Lydia Ramsey, Prom Queen, and Kate Voss.

The arena wars are not over as two groups vie to reshape Seattle’s music scene, Seattle Center, and the future of winter professional sports in Seattle. In this special episode, find out why 33 members of Seattle’s music community weighed in on the arena debate to support one of the two proposals.


You will hear from Jason Finn, drummer for the platinum-selling, grammy-nominated band Presidents of the United States.

You will hear from David Meinert, whose Onto Entertainment manages the platinum selling musicians, The Lumineers.

Today’s episode gives you a better understanding about how Seattle’s music scene can be shaped by the arena proposals.

The arena wars are not over as two groups vie to reshape Seattle’s music scene, Seattle Center, and the future of winter professional sports in Seattle. In this special episode, get an update on the process and hear from Wally Walker and Pete Nordstrom how their group’s efforts to bring an NBA franchise to an arena in Seattle’s Sodo neighborhood can also have an impact on music lovers and musicians in the city.

With an appearance by Ben London and featuring the music of Stag.

Former Sonics executive Wally Walker provides the latest details on the proposal. He describes the investments the group has made throughout the process and why they have not given up. He shares what excites him about his group’s proposal to subdivide Key Arena into smaller indoor and outdoor music venues. He provides insight into how the two arena developments would be financed.

Can we expect a surprise from the Sodo arena group? Hear how Walker responds.

Also in this episode, the co-president of Nordstrom, Pete Nordstrom, opens up about his reaction to the latest news from Seattle City Council. He shares personal stories of the role of music in his life and why his group has made the proposal to convert Key Arena into smaller music venues.

To read more about the proposal described in the podcast, visit

To hear more music from Stag, visit


In this third season of Seattle Growth Podcast, UW Foster professor Jeff Shulman set out to better understand the physical transformation of Seattle. Shulman set across Seattle to learn from real estate developers, residents, and activists about the changes under way. What he found may surprise you.


The season began as an exploration how much the physical landscape of Seattle is changing, who is driving these changes, how people are affected by these changes, and what people are doing to shape the future of Seattle. Along the way, the voices of Seattle expressed a significant challenge facing the community


In this season finale, hear Seattle residents share a common concern about how Seattle is transforming and offer their ideas for action steps that can build progress toward addressing the challenge.


Featuring the voices of Damon Bomar, Tim Thomas, Cole Austin, Martin Henry Kaplan, Queen Pearl Richard, Ethan Phelps Goodman, Alisha Cross, Carl Livingston, Joe Ferguson, and Rev. Dr. Phyllis Beaumonte.

Seattle’s growth is bringing a physical and cultural transformation. Buildings are changing, businesses are changing, and people are changing at a rapid pace. This episode of Seattle Growth Podcast features three expert opinions on how policies from Seattle’s past are shaping the migration patterns of today that will influence Seattle’s future.


Political Science professor Carl Livingston remarks on the renewed vibrancy of downtown Seattle and what he sees Seattle losing during its growth.


University of Washington researcher Tim Thomas shares findings from his dissertation research on migration patterns dating back to the early 20th century.

Mount Zion Baptist Church Historian Rev. Dr. Phyllis Beaumonte describes how the policies affected her family and shares a message of what she hopes people will do to build a strong future for Seattle.